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Larry and Carole
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Early
Antique & Vintage
Patented Sewing Machines

Past Sales Archive

This is just a sample of the many antique sewing machines we have sold.
Click link to see other Past Sales Archive Pages on this Site.

We can help you sell quality Antiques Contact Us.

Special Note Concerning Prices Seen Below:
Most prices seen reflect actual sale results from this website.
Prices seen span a long period of time and may not reflect current values.  Some are selling for more, many now sell for less.
On some pieces you will see no price, or a price range, with or without an explanation.  The reasons for that are discussed on the FAQ page.

For further info on consigning / selling your antiques with us please see our FAQ page, the Appraisal / Selling Page and the Selling Your Collection Pages.

Our current offering of Antiques for sale are at our sister Website Patented-Antiques.com.



Daisy Child Size Antique Sewing Machine"Daisy" Child Size Antique Sewing Machine  A rare and unusual TSM looking for its treadle base or the optional table clamp that can be found for it.  The Daisy Treadle TSM Sewing Machine is considered the best of the toy treadles that can be found.  I have never seen the version with a removable auxiliary table clamp.  A rare thing. 

The cosmetic condition of this unusual sewing machine is great with nearly all the original black finish & gold decoration remaining. It runs freely and smoothly.  It has its original needle. The sew plate has had some nickel loss but is not rusty or pitted.  It is marked with the company name, location of Cleveland Ohio, Patented July 3rd 1887 and the word Improved. The serial number is 103732.

In the treadle version the drive wheel fits through a slot cut in the table top so the machine can sit flat.  With the aux clamp, the wheel sits to the outside of the table edge.  This machine will look great mounted on a block of wood so that wheel is not the first thing to hit the table.  Different, Rare, and Nice!!

Fine . . . . . . . $995.00     SOLD!!




Hook Patent Sewing MachineHook Patent Sewing Machine  The cosmetic condition of this unusual sewing machine is great with nearly all the original finish and decoration remaining.  That is probably because a small spring inside is broken and it would not operate properly. The spring is still present, but will not attach as it was designed to due to a small break in it.  It is repairable.

In her Smithsonian-sponsored book on sewing machines Grace Cooper states that Albert Hook was granted the patent for this unusual machine on November 30th 1858.  The machine is marked with that date.  I could not find that patent using Google.  In the index she calls off a number of 22179.  When you run that number a reissue patent comes up, issued in 1863, as number1592.  I'm not sure what that means.  You can find that patent using a Google search.  Hook was also granted patent number 24027 in 1859 for a similar looking machine, and that patent is also viewable on Google. 

This rare antique sewing machine is incredibly small, measuring about 4" tall overall and 2" square.  It has a built-in clamp to attach it to a work table.  By design, it pushed a hooked needle up from below and formed a chain stitch.  Very few were made, and fewer are known to exist today.  Grace Cooper gives the machine a nice little write-up. The other major reference on antique sewing machines has a picture and one sentence.  There are no other examples to be seen using a Google web or image search, and very little published information beyond what is found in Cooper's book. 

 Different, Rare, and Nice!!

Good + . . . . . . . $3950.00     SOLD!!



Herron Patent Sewing MachineHerron's 1857 Patent Sewing Machine  This is a rare and desirable American patent sewing machine.  The patent for this sewing machine was issued in 1857 to a Abial Herron.  The only one I know of in this country is pictured in Grace Coopers book "The Invention of the Sewing Machine" picturing and describing the example in the Smithsonian's collection. 

This early patented sewing machine is not mentioned or pictured in the other major book on the subject of early patented sewing machines by Carter Bays which is now in its third or fourth printing, meaning he has not been able to acquire one in all those years since his first edition came out in the early 90's.  Carter is recognized by many as the top collector / expert in the US and for one of these to be missing from his collection is indicative of the scarcity of this sewing machine.   In speaking with the former leading American dealer in antique sewing machines, he indicated that over the years he had one just one and that he sold it to an European collector. 

The design looks somewhat like a Watson, but closer examination shows it to be quite different in setup and operation.  It has several distinct differences from those also rare machines.    This sewing machine is marked with the patentees name Herron and the 1857 date on a heart shaped brass plaque on the front of the machine above the needle.

The condition is OK.  There is about 50-60% of the paint and decoration remaining.  Cooper describes these machines as being provided with a handcrank or adapted to use as a treadle machine.  A previous owner has made a small table for this one so it would display properly.  It is unknown what an original set-up would look like or what the treadle looked like.  There are no other examples to compare this too, and the one Cooper shows is just the head.  This machine has one minor condition problem in the casting.  There is a crack in the casting holding the main drive rod.  It is a weak point in the casting, and the piece you see was broken loose.  It was drilled and pinned and is now solid & stable although you can still see the crack.  The machine turns over freely, and its operation can be observed and demonstrated.

Excellent . . . . .$2950.00         SOLD!!





Ketchum Patent Sewing MachineKetchum Patent Sewing Machine  This  "paw foot" sewing machine is also a "Ketchum's Patent" with a mid 1860's patent date on the needle plate on the top.  This patent covers the stitch mechanism, and similar sewing machines can also be found marked "Shaw & Clark" or "Wilson", just two of the many competitors in the early sewing machine market.  The condition of this one is super with 90% or more of the original decoration.  They are often found with little or none of this hand-painted designs on the body and base.  A nice example!!

Paw Foot Machines of this style date from the mid 1860's and were still being produced into the late 1870's before more standardized and advanced designs pushed them from the market.  Many of these machines are found with no maker or patent information on them and they are most probably knockoffs trying to avoid patent infringements.  Some of those machines are very nicely done.  Many are unmarked, and nearly every one is done is a slightly different decoration as they were hand done back then.  

Good + . . . . . . .$1250.00           SOLD!



1858 Watson Patent Sewing Machine1856 Watson Patent Paw Foot Sewing Machine  The Watson patent sewing machine is a nice example of one of the earliest patented American sewing machines having a patent date of 1856.  The machine sports a small brass plaque with the patent info, date, and Watson name on the main cross arm.  The firm was located in Bridgeport CT according to Carter Bay's book on the subject. 

The condition is  great with large amounts of original decoration and finish remaining.  It appears that at some point a coat of clear gloss finish was applied, and this may be original.  There are areas where it has turned yellowish as one would expect from a finish over 100 years old.  This is a  rare and historically significant sewing machine, and one which does not appear on the market very often.   It has a great look and will make for  great display

Good + . . . . . .$3250.00        SOLD!   



Shaw & Clark Paw Foot Sewing MachineShaw & Clark Paw Foot / Fire Hydrant Sewing Machine    The condition of this early patented sewing machine is very good with nearly all the original black paint remaining and most of the hand painted colorful decorations remaining..  There is no rust or corrosion to the exposed metal parts.  This early patented sewing machine has a lot of gold highlighting and floral decorations that were hand painted on the bed.  This particular machine is unmarked, but that is common.  They are generally referred to as Paw foot machines, or as fire hydrant models.  They can then be further identified by terms like ribbed column, or skinny pillar, or open pillar, and a few others.  An interesting machine you do not find every day and rarely in this condition.  .

Good + . . . . . . .$950.00           SOLD!




W.G. Wilson "Paw Foot"-type Sewing Machine  There are many variations of the antique sewing machines that are collectively referred to as "Paw Foot" designs.  The Biddeford, Maine company known as Shaw & Clark was one of the most prolific manufacturers of paw foot machines, producing over half a dozen different variations during the 1860's.  Another lesser known manufacturer of this style of sewing machine was the Midwestern company referred to as W.G. Wilson, who produced machines under Ketchum's April 28, 1863 patent.  This is an example of one of their machines, and it is so marked with the patent info on the stitch plate.  This early chain-stitch sewing machine is spectacular in its design and its colorful embellishment.  It retains much of its original brightly colored floral paint and gold pinstriping.  Note the details of the fire hydrant style body topped with an elegant finial, the ornate scalloped-edge base, and the well-defined feet.  This machine utilized the New England style "walking" presser foot to move the fabric along instead of the more typical feeddog mechanism, and an unusual horizontal spool pin for the thread.  Oftentimes these machines are found in much lesser condition, so if you have been waiting for one the you'll be proud to display be sure to take a close look at this great example!

Good . . . . .$950.00          SOLD



Antique Paw Foot Sewing MachineEarly Paw Foot Style Sewing Machine  This style of "paw foot" sewing machine is known by several different names and comes in a number of different variations.  They are occasionally found marked "Ketchum's Patent", which would cover the stitch mechanism, and they can also be found marked "Shaw & Clark" or "Wilson", just two of the many competitors in the early sewing machine market.  Machines of this style date from the mid 1860's and were still being produced into the late 1870's before more standardized and advanced designs pushed them from the market.  Many of these machines are found with no maker or patent information on them, and this example is one of the  unmarked ones.  They are often described by the shape of the pillar or column, and this one would be known as a fire hydrant model.  Other typically seen styles are the fluted column model, the skinny column, the open or closed square column, and others.  The operation and design of all are pretty much the same.  This type of machine forms a single thread chain stitch utilizing no bobbin or second thread to form a lockstitch.  Their attractive designs make them highly sought after, but they are typically found in horrible condition with little remaining paint. This example on the other hand is quite nice with approximately 80%-90% of the original paint and decoration remaining.

Excellent . . . . .$950.00          SOLD



c. 1870 Antique Paw Foot Sewing MachineEarly Paw Foot Style Sewing Machine  The condition is very nice!!

Excellent . . . . .$1450.00          SOLD






Patented Sewing MachineShaw & Clark Closed Pillar Sewing Machine from Biddeford, Maine  The several different models of vintage sewing machines produced by this Maine company are some of the best known and most actively sought after of all antique sewing machines from the early era of production in the mid to late 1800's.  Shaw & Clark put out a half dozen or so different models over the years, and they have come to be referred to by nicknames that attempt to describe their distinguishing feature.  This example is known as Shaw & Clark's "closed pillar" model.  (As an aside, there are also the "open pillar", the "fire hydrant", the "skinny pillar", and a few more variations.)  There are also a large number of early knockoffs that are often referred to as " Shaw & Clarks", but which really not---they were manufactured in competition during this era in violation of this company's patents, thus partially explaining their being unmarked.  This one is clearly marked with the Shaw & Clark name boldly cast into the bottom of the base as well as on the brass medallion where the patent information can be found next to the pillar.   The condition of this antique sewing machine is very good---many it seems are found with virtually no paint remaining and only occasionally are they found  in near pristine condition.  This one, thought not pristine, is very good with most of the decorative and colorful floral design remaining.

Very Good . . . . .$1650.00          SOLD



Shaw & Clark Open Pillar Sewing Machine / Biddeford, MaineShaw & Clark Open Pillar Sewing Machine / Biddeford, Maine  The several different models of vintage sewing machines produced by this Maine company are some of the best known and most actively sought after of all antique sewing machines from the early era of production in the mid to late 1800's.  Shaw & Clark put out a half dozen or so different models over the years, and they have come to be referred to by nicknames that attempt to describe their distinguishing feature.  This example is known as Shaw & Clark's "closed pillar" model.  (As an aside, there are also the "open pillar", the "fire hydrant", the "skinny pillar", and a few more variations.)  This is the hard to find Open Pillar.
Very Good . . . . .$2495.00           SOLD



Shaw & Clark Patent Sewing MachinePaw Foot Cast Iron Sewing Machine by Shaw & Clark This style of sewing machine, circa 1860-70,  is generally attributed to the Shaw & Clark Co. of Biddeford, Maine or assorted other New England manufacturers. There are many interesting variations in the design of these machines that exist, but all utilize a revolving hook chain-stitch mechanism and a walking presser foot.  This example features a ribbed fire hydrant style body topped with an acorn-shaped finial.  There is still a good amount of original black paint and colorful floral / gold scroll decoration remaining, although the base does show some minor areas of surface rust.  The spool holder on this example is missing, but still a good one to add to the collection.

Good+ . . . . .$750.00          SOLD



Foley & Williams "Practical" Round Wooden Sewing Machine  This is a rare variation of the more commonly seen Triumph Sewing Machine that was made by the same manufacturer Foley & Williams back near the turn of the century.  That is not, by any means, to say that the Triumph is a common machine, but over the years, if we have seen 50 or owned a handful of those, this is only the second one of the Practical we have ever had the opportunity to buy or offer for sale.   If you are not familiar with the design, the entire body and base are made of wood, and this is typically referred to as the doughnut machine.  There is a metal frame on the backside to reinforce this.

The missing paint and finish on the base is simply honest wear from where this machine was clamped to the table during use.  At different periods, machines like this were marketed as either toys for the child to learn and practice on, or they were also marketed as travel machines for use in the summer home or on trips to do simple mending.  This machine is in very nice condition noting the base .  The removable piece of the circle, on the left, and pin to hold it, are present and original.   A difficult to find machine!


Very Good . . .  . .$1450.00          SOLD


Madame Demorest Sewing Machine Patented May 18th 1862Madame Demorest Sewing Machine Patented May 18th 1862  This interesting and early patented device was one of the first machines to earn the title of sewing machine, even though all it did was gather up the material and run the needle through it.   That effort would form what is known as a running stitch, like that used for basting.  There is a history of the Demorest Manufacturing Company that can be found on the internet. That history claims the company was in business from the mid 1840's. This machine is clearly marked with a patent drawn in 1862.

This example is in near mint condition, still exhibiting most of its original gold gilding. It is complete with its edge guide, screw feed, and the cast iron screw clamp that fits underneath and was used to attach it to a table edge  The patent info is along the edge.  This example is slightly different than those pictured in Carter Bays' book and there were several different variations produced.  The idea or novelty of  this machine must have been appealing, as there are several other varieties of this style machine that are known. They were produced during the same early 1860's pre-Civil War period. The copied models were probably bootleg models to try and horn in on this fellow's "wonderful" idea and profit margin. The most commonly seen is the "Family Gem", which is pretty much an exact copy minus the lady head cast into the body. It does carry the same patent dates.

It is amazing that one could find anybody to buy one of these as they are such a silly idea. I would bet that I could beat this machine's output with a needle and thread in hand, and I cannot sew, but that is the sort of thing that makes for great collectibles. This "sewing machine" is an important link in the development of the early American sewing machine and they are very graphic and beautiful in form. These are not offered very often, and are quite hard to find in this nice condition these days. Highly recommend!

Fine + . . . . . . .$1250.00       SOLD!!




1860 Patent Williams & Orvis Sewing Machine Rare 1860's Patent Williams & Orvis  Treadle Sewing Machine  Williams & Orvis was a Boston-based company that manufactured sewing machines for just a few short years from 1858 to the mid 1860's, according to the Smithsonian book on antique sewing machines by Grace Rogers Cooper.  Examples of this machine are few and far between and this example is the first one we have ever owned or offered.  This version is known as the second model, and it features a wonderful figural head design that resembles a dolphin or other such graceful creature.  The elegant form is especially striking because of it's petite size.  This treadle machine is unusual in that it is friction-driven, utilizing a large flywheel that is mounted underneath.  Rather than being attached to the machine with a belt, the flywheel presses against a rubber ring that is fastened directly to the machine's drive-wheel.  This example still retains much of the gilt decoration that is so often worn off of these early machines.  And if you look closely you can still make out the manufacturer's name and location in the gold lettering that appears at the base of the arm.  The stitchplate is clearly marked "Patent Applied For".  The finish is no doubt in such nice condition due to the fact that the wooden hood or cover has remained intact with the machine.   The decorative cast iron treadle stand is in excellent condition as well, with no cracks or breaks in the casting.  The pin that attaches the rod to the treadle plate has been replaced with a nail which could easily be changed out if wanted.  This is a hard-to-find early patented sewing machine in outstanding condition.

Excellent . . . . .$2450.00          SOLD



New England Style Patented Antique Sewing MachineNew England Style Patented Antique Sewing Machine  These are a very early design.  They are also very common and were made for a long time under a number of names.  What is uncommon is to find them in nice condition.   It is one of the nicest we have seen!

Excellent . . . . .$650.00          SOLD






1858 
	Patent New England Style Sewing Machine1858 Patent New England Style Sewing Machine  These antique sewing machines are commonly referred to as New England-styles,  and were actually made by many different manufacturers both here in the US, Canada and in England, where they were known as the Weir.  These machines feature an unusual "walking" presser foot to move the fabric along from above, rather than the more typical underneath feed-dog mechanism.  This particular example has been in our collection for some time, as we were intrigued by the design and decoration.  Generally they are done in floral designs, and this one is also on the base, but the end plate has what appears to be a tomato, grapes, and cherries.  The condition of the paint is super.  So many of these machines are worn almost completely bare, but not this example.  It is one of the nicest we have seen!

Excellent . . . . .$450.00           SOLD


New England Style Patented Sewing MachineNew England Style Patented Sewing Machine  The condition of this machine is very good with nearly all the original black paint remaining.  There is  no rust or corrosion to the metal parts.  It has a lot of gold highlighting and floral decorations on the end plate and bed.   An interesting machine you do not find every day and certainly not in this nice condition.

Good + . . . . . . .$595.00          SOLD!





Patented Foliage Sewing MachineRare "Foliage" Figural Sewing Machine  This rare and unusual antique sewing machine was manufactured by D. W. Clark of Bridgeport, CT.  It was patented in 1858 and produced for just a few short years, which explains why so very few of them are ever seen except in long-time collections.  (Several years ago one came up for sale at a German auction house and brought just over $7K.)  Although often referred to as being cast brass it is actually made of a material known as gunmetal, a harder and stronger brass-type alloy.  With its diminutive size---it measures only about 6" across and 4" high---and its appealing foliage-like casting design, it is undoubtedly one of the most graphic and beautifully designed of all antique sewing machines ever produced, large or small.  This example is in excellent condition and completely original.  The patent information is clearly stamped on the underside.  An early and historically significant American patented sewing machine!

Excellent . . . . .  SOLD



Patented 1858 Clark Patent Foliage Sewing MachineRare "Foliage" Figural Sewing Machine  This is the third one of these I have had and sold in 30 some years.  They were the only 3 I had ever seen or heard of.   The first and least expensive was bought on eBay and sold to a collector who never bothers to go there for a number of reasons.  The other two were consigned to me by the owners after they had found reference on this site to the first one I had sold.  I can help you sell your as well.

Excellent . . . . .  SOLD




Patented Hancock Integral-Clamp Antique Sewing MachineEarly Patented Hancock Integral-Clamp Antique Sewing Machine The first sewing machines had barely been invented when Henry J. Hancock received his 1867 patent for this unusual chain stitch machine.  The design of this early sewing machine, with its very delicate open-frame "skeleton" body and integral clamp, is incredibly appealing.  Examples of this unusual sewing machine are extremely scarce.  Hancocks were only produced for 10 or so years which explains why they are seldom found and rarely offered for sale.  For those antique sewing machine collectors who seek out examples of the very earliest patents, this machine is always at the top of their "want list".  This particular example came straight out of a Midwestern estate.  The stitchplate is clearly marked with the 1867 patent date as well as 1868 and 1869 patent improvement dates.  There are no casting flaws or cracks in the delicate casting, and although there is considerable paint loss, the surface exhibits a dark rich patina that one would expect from a 130-year-old antique.  There is no pitting or rust, and all and all it looks very good.  Likewise the brass parts have not been polished and retain a deep mellow tone.  As is generally the case in machines of this age, the needle is missing, but other than that the sewing machine is complete.  The seam guide has been adapted from a different newer sewing machine to resemble the original.

Good + . . . . .$1295.00          SOLD



Novelty Integral-Clamp Antique Sewing MachineNovelty Integral-Clamp Antique Sewing Machine Not sure how they picked the name for this machine, but it is kind of a novel idea with the needle coming up from below.   It was worth a patent and it is a difficult machine to find. 

Good + . . . . .$1295.00          SOLD






Patented Leather Folding / Sewing MachinePatented Leather Folding / Sewing Machine This unusual device has about a half dozen patents.  It was meant for the shoe making industry and while it looks like a sewing machine it has no needle.  It was designed to cut, fold and make seams.  Like many patents from this era they make for difficult reading. 

Good  . . . . .$450.00          SOLD






Patented Lamb KnitterEarly Patented Lamb Knitter I do believe you could whip out a sweater or pair of mittens just as quick as you can turn the crank on this antique knitting machine, assuming you could figure it out!   Marked on a brass medallion on the end is "The Lamb Knitting Machine Manf'g Co. Rochester, NY" as well as the very early patent dates of Oct. 10, 1865 and Sept. 15, 1868.  It is also marked with the number 1815, which I assume is the serial number.  This antique knitting device is very graphic and very mechanical, and there are several extras to go with it.  Just in case you need help figuring out how it works the original 30-page instruction booklet is included.  It is in the condition you would expect for a booklet that is over 100 years old---the pages are very readable, although they are rather brittle with tears here and there, and the cover as well as some of the other pages are loose. 

But it contains a wealth of information on setting up the machine, and making such wardrobe necessities as leggins, a breakfast cape, wristlets, undershirts, nubias, tidies, stockings, sweaters, mittens and gloves.  Also included is a 24-page 1884 catalog and price list of assorted models of Lamb Knitting Machines and accessories. The amazing thing is that this machine cost well over $100 back then at the same time that Sears Roebuck was selling treadle sewing machines for just $15 or so.  Finally several of the accessories themselves are included and they are pictured.


Good + . . . . .$650.00           SOLD


BACK

This is just a sample of the many antiques & collectibles we have sold.
Click link to see other Sales Archive Pages on this Site.

We can help you sell quality Antiques Contact Us.

For further info on consigning / selling your antiques with us please see our FAQ page, the Appraisal / Selling Page and the Selling Your Collection Pages.

Our current offering of Antiques for sale are at our sister Website Patented-Antiques.com.


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(1998 - 2015)
Larry & Carole Meeker